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Eric Gill - H. Cotton Minchin collection

 Collection
Identifier: GTM-GAMMS299
The Eric Gill - H. Cotton Minchin Collection consists of correspondence dated 1928 to 1929, mostly from Eric Gill to H. Cotton Minchin, concerning an engraving that Gill provided for "The Legion Book." That book was edited by Minchin and published in 1929, and contributions and illustrations were solicited from the leading writers and artists of the day, including Gill. In the letters, Gill discusses the details for the work to be done. One of the letters in the collection is from Gill to Leonard Halsey, and it also deals with "The Legion Book" engraving. All of the correspondence in the collection is from Gill. The Eric Gill - H. Cotton Minchin Collection is contained in one small archival box (0.25 linear feet). The letters are arranged in chronological order.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - (Arthur) Eric (Rowton) Gill (1882-1940), noted British sculptor, engraver, typographic designer, and writer, was born in Brighton, Sussex, England on February 22, 1882, the son of Arthur Tidman Gill and Cicely Rose King Gill. He studied for two years in art school in Chichester. In 1899, he became an apprentice to London architect W.D. Caroe. Then, in 1902, Gill focused on letter carving after studying with Edward Johnston at the Central School of Arts and Crafts. In 1904, Gill married Mary Ethel. He worked until 1910 as a carver of tombstones. Turning his attention to figure sculpture, he won praise for his "Mother and Child" in 1912. In 1913, Gill was received into the Catholic church. Using Hoptonwood stone, he carved the stations of the cross for Westminster Cathedral from 1914 to 1918, and he produced the famous "Mankind" in 1928 with the same stone. Gill's other major works included "Prospero and Ariel" in 1931 and "The Creation of Adam" from 1935 to 1938. In 1915, with Douglas Pepler, Gill founded St. Dominic's Press, where he contributed engravings and lettering and wrote on the relationship between religion and art. The Golden Cockerel Press asked him to do engravings in 1924. "The Four Gospels" is Gill's best remembered book as it was printed from type designed by him for the press. Gill also formed a private press with his son-in-law Rene Hague at his home in Pigotts. Eric Gill died on November 17, 1940. [Sources: "Dictionary of National Biography. 1931-1940." Edited by L.G. Wickhamn Legg. London: Oxford University Press, 1949. "Eric Gill." "Encyclopedia Britannica Online."] H. Cotton Minchin was the editor of "The Legion Book" and other things. He was known to J.R.R. Tolkien.

Dates

  • 1928-1929

Collection-level Access Restrictions

Most manuscripts collections at the Georgetown University Booth Family Center for Special Collections are open to researchers; however, restrictions may apply to some collections. Collections stored off site require a minimum of three days for retrieval. For use of all manuscripts collections, researchers are advised to contact the Booth Family Center for Special Collections in advance of any visit.

Extent

0.25 Linear Feet (1 box)

Biographical note

(Arthur) Eric (Rowton) Gill (1882-1940), noted British sculptor, engraver, typographic designer, and writer, was born in Brighton, Sussex, England on February 22, 1882, the son of Arthur Tidman Gill and Cicely Rose King Gill. He studied for two years in art school in Chichester. In 1899, he became an apprentice to London architect W.D. Caroe. Then, in 1902, Gill focused on letter carving after studying with Edward Johnston at the Central School of Arts and Crafts. In 1904, Gill married Mary Ethel. He worked until 1910 as a carver of tombstones. Turning his attention to figure sculpture, he won praise for his "Mother and Child" in 1912. In 1913, Gill was received into the Catholic church. Using Hoptonwood stone, he carved the stations of the cross for Westminster Cathedral from 1914 to 1918, and he produced the famous "Mankind" in 1928 with the same stone. Gill's other major works included "Prospero and Ariel" in 1931 and "The Creation of Adam" from 1935 to 1938. In 1915, with Douglas Pepler, Gill founded St. Dominic's Press, where he contributed engravings and lettering and wrote on the relationship between religion and art. The Golden Cockerel Press asked him to do engravings in 1924. "The Four Gospels" is Gill's best remembered book as it was printed from type designed by him for the press. Gill also formed a private press with his son-in-law Rene Hague at his home in Pigotts. Eric Gill died on November 17, 1940. [Sources: "Dictionary of National Biography. 1931-1940." Edited by L.G. Wickhamn Legg. London: Oxford University Press, 1949. "Eric Gill." "Encyclopedia Britannica Online."]

H. Cotton Minchin was the editor of "The Legion Book" and other things. He was known to J.R.R. Tolkien.
Title
Eric Gill - H. Cotton Minchin collection
Status
completed
Author
Georgetown University Library Booth Family Center for Special Collections
Date
12/31/2005
Description rules
local practice
Language of description
English

Repository Details

Part of the Georgetown University Manuscripts Repository

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